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Seven Reasons to Choose Home Care

As tough as it may be to enlist the help of a “stranger” when it comes to caring for your parents, sometimes it’s for the best. For one thing, it will take the strain off of you, but your parent will also benefit from professional care in the comforts of home. Whether it’s being attentive to special medical needs of assisting with personal care or homemaking, having a home health care professional will provide a variety of benefits to both the patient and the family.

1 – Home Care promotes healing.
Our clients enjoy a much better quality of life which many families have said helped to extend the lives of their lived ones.. We focused on healing the mind, not just the body. CEO of Visiting Nurse Regional Health Care System adds that in many circumstances the person rehabilitates better in the home. “They are in a familiar environment and are more comfortable. This is particularly true with individuals suffering from dementias.”

2 – Home Care is safe.
Many risks such as infection are eliminated or minimized when care is given at home. Quality home care by professional caregivers can help prevent issues that may become very serious within the home. One example includes preventing falls in the home since seniors may be too weak or dizzy from medication since they fall when they’re cleaning or bathing.

3 – Home care allows for maximum amount of freedom for the individual.
Patients at home may be engaged with their typical daily activities as their health permits plus it allows patients to receive care in the least restrictive environment. This is the most conducive to patient-centered care which allows individuals the most control over the care they’ll receive and the manner in which they receive it. It allows individuals to remain in the community.

4 – Home care gives them some control.
As baby boomers age the home care option gives them more control over the type of care they’ll get to choose.  Seniors want more choices and want to be a more active participant in their own care. Home care allows them the most say in their care as they are in the least passive situation.

5 – Home care is personalized.
The best reason to choose home care is because the care that will be received in the home will be individualized to each patient according to their specific needs. Essentially home care is tailored to the needs of each patient as they receive one-on-one attention.

6 – It eases burdens on the family.
With the length of stay in the hospital decreasing patients are going home earlier and many of them do not choose to go to a rehabilitation center to recover.  Rather, they want to go home to their own environment with their loved ones and have someone provide them with care they’ll need to reach their maximum level of function. Families are willing to have their loved ones with them, but may feel inadequate or unable to provide their loved ones with the help that they might need.

7 – Home care is comfortable.
Every study done has shown that people would prefer to stay in their home. There is familiarity and comfort of being in one’s own environment surrounded by their loved ones. It’s a type of quality care that people would want for their senior relatives.

First Steps for New Caregivers

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When you’re starting out as a family caregiver, it’s hard to know where to begin. Perhaps you’ve only recently realized that a loved one needs assistance, and is no longer as self-sufficient as he or she once was. Or perhaps there has been a sudden change in a loved one’s health. Now it’s time to take action, and take stock of the people, services and information that will help you care for your loved one. The earlier you find support, the better.

Step 1
Start with a diagnosis. If your loved one is forgetful at times or has gone through a noticeable personality change, take him or her to a neurologist or diagnostic clinic. A thorough evaluation will rule out any reversible causes of dementia symptoms, such as depression, nutritional deficiencies, reactions to medication or infection. An early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, or another disease that causes cognitive impairment, has many benefits. First, treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is most effective in the earlier stages and can buy more independence for your loved one. Second, knowing your loved one’s diagnosis can help you plan ahead realistically. Learn as much as you can about your family member’s condition. This information will confirm that you are not imagining things or exaggerating your loved one’s behavior. Especially when you’re dealing with dementia’learning about the diagnosis will help you keep in mind that it’s the disease that is causing your loved one to gradually lose control over his or her behavior. Many books, videos and classes are available to inform you about what you can expect as your loved one’s disease progresses.

Step 2
Talk with your loved one about his or her finances and health care wishes. If your relative is able to complete a Durable Power of Attorney for finances and health care, assist her or him in meeting with an elderlaw specialist to draw up these documents. This planning can help relieve your immediate anxiety and make you better prepared for the future. It can also start important discussions with your family members. If your loved one doesn’t have the capacity to execute these documents, you will need further
legal advice to learn about your options.

Step 3
At this stage, consider inviting family and close friends to come together and discuss your loved one’s care. If possible, your loved one should be included in the meeting. List the tasks that are needed so they can be more easily divided up. Let everyone discuss their concerns, as well as how much and what kind of help each person can offer. As the primary caregiver, it’s best for you to focus on accepting what assistance your friends and family are offering, even if it’s not exactly what you had in mind. .

Step 4
Take advantage of community resources such asMeals onWheels and homecare companies. These resources are available so that you don’t have to do everything yourself ‘and to give you a break.

Step 5
After all of this planning, don’t forget what’s most important: finding support for yourself. Caregivers often feel isolated as they take on more responsibility, and as their social lives move into the background. A support group is a good place to meet other family caregivers who have really “been there”. You can attend support groups in your community, as well as through the Internet.

Is Caregiving Impacting Your Career?

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Plan ahead to maintain your sanity as an employee, caregiver and person.
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The boss wants you to attend a breakfast meeting, but your dad has a 9 a.m. doctor’s appointment. You really need to stay late at work to meet a deadline, but you can’t leave your mother alone in the evenings. Sound familiar?

When trying to balance the demands of your job with the needs of an aging family member, your family has to take priority. But does your career have to suffer a permanent setback when you’re a caregiver

Nearly 66 million people in the United States are unpaid family caregivers, according to a 2009 study from the National Alliance for Caregiving report. More than 70 percent of those caregivers have jobs — in addition to clocking in an average 24 hours a week caring for a family member.

Ideally, you’ll need flexibility in your work life to optimally handle both roles. Without this, many family caregivers find they are unable to maintain the level of employment they had been accustomed to. In fact, the National Alliance for Caregiving found that 70 percent of working caregivers make changes to work schedules by cutting back on hours, changing jobs or taking a leave of absence. Changes to one’s work life can have a huge impact on your career and financial future, so it is important to weigh all options before making a move.

Before you do anything drastic, consider the tips below to help you integrate your career and your caregiving responsibilities.

  1. Know What to Expect
    “Preparation can help eliminate potential burn out, anxiety and additional health concerns due to the added responsibilities,” says Catherine L. Owens, author of “Be Your Own Hero: Senior Living Decisions Simplified.”

    Find a support group for caregivers in similar situations. For example, if you’re caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, locate a local support group through the Alzheimer’s Association. Fellow members can offer advice on how they manage caregiving and working simultaneously. You also may be surprised that you have advice to offer other family caregivers, and this can feel empowering.

  2. Look at Your Schedule
    Take a cold, hard look at your schedule. How has it changed since you started taking on caregiving responsibilities? And will those responsibilities grow or get easier in the future? Don’t overlook the smaller obligations that still need to get done.

    Estimate how much time you spend on different tasks throughout the day. Are you making lots of calls to doctors during working hours? Are you staying up late finishing projects for work? Trying to do too much will only burn you out faster. If your schedule isn’t manageable, you need to see where you can make adjustments or get help.

  3. Think About Finances
    Is your bank account struggling because you’re caring for a loved one? When they care for a loved one, women forfeit about $324,044 and men $303,880 in lost wages and Social Security benefits, according to the MetLife Study of Caregiving Costs to Working Caregivers. Do you have savings to help cover your expenses?
  4. Hold a Family Meeting
    Don’t try to go it alone. “Have an honest discussion with your family and loved one to establish clear guidelines, roles and responsibilities, as well as the concerns, fears and hopes of everyone involved,” Owens suggests. Try to share the load: Perhaps one sibling takes charge of financial matters, while another handles transportation or medication management.
  5. Discover Community Resources
    Educate yourself on the caregiving, medical and financial services available before your loved one needs you; if your sick mom requires more support than you can provide, you can make necessary decisions and preparations ahead of time, Owens suggests. “This removes the stress of trying to navigate options during a time of crisis or an emergency.” Your local Area Agency on Aging may be able to help.
  6. Research Flextime
    If your caregiving duties are taking up more and more of your 9-5 hours, it may help to look into a flexible schedule.

    “Flexible and telecommuting jobs are growing, and more employers are open to allowing employees to take advantage of these options,” says Sara Sutton Fell, CEO and founder of Flexjobs.com.

    Do you know anyone in your field who takes advantage of this trend? Ask how they make it work.

  7. Inform Your Employer of Your Situation
    Make sure your boss understands your changing responsibilities outside the workplace and your need for flexibility.

    “First and foremost, create a formal proposal that outlines how the flexibility you’re asking for will benefit the company, rather than how it will benefit you,” shares Sutton Fell. Let your employer know how and when you’ll do your work, your plans for staying in touch with management and co-workers and how you’ll measure productivity.

    “Ask your managers for a meeting to discuss your proposal, rather than springing it on them casually,” she says. “The more prepared you are, the better your boss will take the request.”

  8. Consider Your Career Options
    If your current job won’t allow for any flexibility, it may be time for a change. Sutton Fell recommends pursuing work in fields that are more likely to allow telecommuting, such as medical, computing, IT, customer service, administrative, sales, education, marketing, web/software development, nonprofits or philanthropy. However, deciding on a career change should be the result of thoughtful consideration and communication with important, trusted people in your life. You’ll need to understand both the risks and benefits.
  9. Know Your Legal Rights
    If your loved one is going to need extensive care, it may be simpler to take some time off. The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (FMLA) is a federal law that guarantees many individuals of certain up to 12 weeks leave in a 12-month period to care for a spouse, child or parent with a serious medical condition, while preserving your job. Eligibility for this benefit can vary by state, so do your research before exploring this option. Some states even have a broader definition of who the care recipient can be to take advantage of this benefit. Keep in mind, however, your employer doesn’t have to pay you during this leave, but must continue your health insurance benefits.

Setting realistic expectations at home and at work are key to maintaining your sanity as a caregiver. “It is common to see a more rapid decline in the health of a care provider than that of the person being cared for,” says Owens.

If you don’t care for yourself, you’ll be poorly equipped to care for a loved one or be a productive employee. But planning ahead and constantly reevaluating your role in your workplace and at home will help you maintain the necessary balance.

Safe Winter Activities for Seniors

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For elderly home care providers looking after a senior loved one, the winter season can bring a number of challenges. Not only do now and ice come with an increased chance of slips and falls, but the cold weather can also leave many seniors completely home bound. When your loved ones are not able to get out of the house safely, they can not only become bored and restless, but they can develop seasonal depression as well. With this in mind, every elderly home care provider interested in keeping their loved one safe, happy and entertained during the winter should keep these safe winter activities in mind.

During the winter you may be limited on the times you can take your elderly loved one out in public. When you do need to take them out in winter weather, make sure they have the right warm clothing and footwear on to keep them safe and comfortable. If you can, try to only take them out during the day. At night, it can be difficult to see hidden patches of ice.

Consider indoor activities that your loved one can do, such as flower arranging, cards, painting, sewing, knitting or crafts with their grandchildren. If your loved one enjoys gardening help them create an indoor greenhouse that they can grow and tend to indoors. Baking is also a great hobby to take up in the winter. Bake with your loved one and consider sending your creations to local organizations that may need them. If you have a network of individuals you know providing elderly home care to older adults, consider starting a recipe club where you can swap new recipes to try.

Instead of simply trying to fill them time when your loved one is bored, try to plan an activity every day. Perhaps Wednesdays are card club days or Tuesdays are baking days. The more organized your activities are the better. This will not only help keep your loved one on a schedule, but it will also give them something to look forward to in the winter months. The cold weather can be a challenge for any elderly home care provider, but if you are organized and have a plan for filling your time, you can all have a safe and happy winter season.

Memory Loss

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Memory loss is something we all experience in life. We forget familiar names, we cannot remember where we left our wallets and purses the previous evening, and we can’t remember everything needed at the grocery store without having a list. This type of memory loss is perfectly normal and as we age, such mild forgetfulness may start happening more and more.

However there are also times when memory loss is not attributed to aging. For example, memory loss is one of the first signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Memory loss can also happen after suffering a traumatic experience. It can happen if you suffer from depression or are lonely, sad, worried and even when you’re bored. It can result from dehydration, or after falling and hitting your head, or because of the way different medications you’re taking interact with one another. Excessive use of drugs and alcohol can also be factors in memory loss.

When does memory loss occur?

Every person is different, but most will begin noticing forgetfulness around mid-life. What happens with memory loss is that over the course of your life, your brain cells start to die off causing a normal decline in your brain’s ability to remember.

Sometimes brain cells become damaged, such as after a stroke or a series of mini-strokes. Strokes interfere with the normal flow of blood to the brain, oftentimes decreasing its supply. Head injuries can also damage brain cells and cause memory loss.

Bringing the Senior Back into Senior Care: Respecting Your Loved Ones’ Feelings

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It happens slowly at first.  Over weeks, months, or years you begin to notice that Mom and Dad aren’t as sharp as they used to be.  Then one day, you realize that you’ve started making decisions for them.  It’s just easier, faster.  Eventually, you can see that you’ve become the parent, making decisions large and small.  And nobody – not you or your parent – is particularly happy about the arrangement.

Fortunately, there is an alternative scenario.

Elder care experts say cooperative planning, with you and your loved ones making decisions together, results in happier seniors and less-stressed caretakers. “All of us want some participation and some say in what’s happening in our lives,” says Lisa Kidd, R.N., B.S.N., administrator for Baptist Home Health Care in Jacksonville, Florida.  “You’re going to get a lot more buy-in and a lot more happiness from someone who feels they made some contribution.”

Cooperation doesn’t have to mean a sit-down planning marathon.  In fact, Kidd says small, casual questions worked into day-to-day activities is the best approach.  “Aging is a fact of life. You don’t want to put your loved ones on the defensive or make them feel degraded,” she says.  “Instead, when you’re out shopping for clothes with your mom, mention that you sometimes have trouble with buttons or tight collars. Ease into a conversation.  Ask if she ever has trouble getting dressed. Ask what she would like to see happen when and if she gets to the point where she can’t dress herself.  If you have the conversation before it becomes a real need, it’s much less emotionally-charged.”

Once a senior, states a preference, the topic can be revisited later, Kidd notes.  For example, a parent might say “when I can’t cook for myself anymore, I’m going to go to an assisted living place.”  When the day comes and the parent or grandparent clearly isn’t safe at the stove, you can bring up that conversation.  Maybe dad or granddad will want to start looking at assisted living apartments, or maybe he’ll decide he’d rather have someone come to the house to prepare meals.  You can help him find a home health aide or part-time cook, but the decision was his.

“One of the challenges for adult children is balancing their parents need for autonomy and control with their desire to be helpful and pragmatic,” says Jody Gastfriend, vice president of Care Management at Care.com and LICSW (Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker).

“Avoiding an impasse can be done more effectively when you plan ahead.  Expressing concerns in an empathic, rather that coercive manner is important in setting the tone for communication. Eliciting your parents’ wishes and fears is particularly valuable because it can set the stage for collaborative problem solving,” says Gastfriend.  “An elder who is worried about losing independence may be reluctant to give up driving, but might be willing to share fears of driving on the highway or at night, which can lead to a discussion about alternative transportation.  Those who communicate early and often typically have better outcomes and more options for care.”

Of course, advance planning also allows for some revision of pie-in-the-sky dreams that may have taken hold.  Many people expect they’ll stay in their own homes until they die, without really thinking about whether they will be capable of maintaining a residence, or even doing simple chores, by themselves.  Those who expect to move to a senior-supportive environment may have visions of buying a condo at a resort-style mature adult community that is simply cost-prohibitive.  “A lot of a person’s future is determined by finances,” says Kidd.  “You really need to ask how your loved one envisions their future and then say ‘what is this going to cost?’  They need to know realistically what their options are while they can understand and state preferences.  You may find that your mother – who always said she wanted to go to assisted living – didn’t realize she would have to sell the family home and half her possessions in order to afford the facility she likes.”

Make no mistake: we all grow older and when we do, some shifting of roles is inevitable.  Sometimes a capable, can-do adult will suddenly become incapable, at which point loved ones must step in.

“When my father was diagnosed with dementia, we eventually had to take the difficult step of assuming legal guardianship, when he was no longer able to make decisions on his own behalf,” Gastfriend says.  “This did not mean, however, that my father was incapable.  It is important for caregivers to understand and elicit the strengths and capabilities that may be masked by dementia or other chronic illnesses. I don’t view caregiving as a role reversal-our parents are always our parents, even when they are incapacitated.  Rather, caregiving is a redefinition of roles.  The caregiving journey often follows an unpredictable and circuitous path, but despite the many hurdles along the way, it can also enrich our lives and our relationships with our loved ones.”

Encourage cooperative decision-making:

  • Engage your parent or grandparent in conversation.  Learn how they see their future and how they expect to handle the challenges that come with age.
  • Look at your family resources, both financial and personal.  What can you present to your loved one in terms of options?
  • Research external services, facilities and resources.  What does the community have to offer?  Discuss these options with your senior.
  • Consider your parent or grandparent’s temperament and personality.  A social, outgoing senior needs a way to interact with other people.  A very private, reserved senior may do better with in-home assistance than in an assisted living setting.  Gently steer the conversation to choices that make a good fit.
  • Consider your own needs.  It doesn’t help anyone for you to feel stressed, exhausted, broke or guilty.  Don’t offer more than you can do.

What Is Alzheimers Disease?

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Alzheimers Disease is one of the saddest and frightening diseases. Over the course of several years, it progresses through stages similar to a child growing up…only in reverse. We start as adults, able to think and remember. Then, it becomes more difficult to remember recent things or to calculate even simple things. As Alzheimer’s progresses, we become less able to run simple machines (like TV’s, Cars, Cameras) or to find our way around…we even tend to forget who are our children or friends. Over time, we forget how to dress, brush our teeth, shower. In the final stages, we forget how to feed ourselves or to control our bowel and bladder. Here are some top-selling books to help you understand what Alzheimer’s Disease is and how to manage it.

Note: After caring for my mother who had Alzheimers disease, I can tell you there is a redeeming quality of the disease. As near as I could tell, once she was in the mid-stage of the disease, it didn’t seem to bother her at all. It’s as if she “forgot” anything was wrong. This seemed common to most of the people in the Alzheimers care facility where she lived the last few years. They all seemed happy and well adjusted.

Alzheimers Disease Signs And Symptoms:

If you take a look at the early stages above, you’ll see the common signs. If you suspect Alzheimer’s see a doctor and ask him to do a blood test for Vitamin B-12 deficiency. If there is no deficiency, get a referral to a Neurologist, who can test your thinking ability. Don’t just assume because you’ve had some memory lapses, it’s Alzheimers disease.

Alzheimers Disease Treatment:

If you catch it in the early stages, there are drugs that can slow the disease, but no cures. At some point, Alzheimers disease will make it necessary to have professional residential care. It’s best to plan things in advance during the early stages and find a quality facility acceptable to both the patient and the one who will be making the health care decisions.

Alzheimers Disease Self Help:

Follow a low fat, high protein diet with lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. Get plenty of aerobic activity and exercise. Make sure you’re drinking enough water. Supplement your diet with natural Multi-Vitamins and Multi-Minerals, along with extra doses of the following to strengthen your blood flow, mental ability and immune system:

Antioxidants; including Beta Carotene, Flavonoids, Lycopene, Vitamin A, Zinc, Vitamin E, Vitamin C and CoQ10.
Organic Germanium; 300-450mg divided into 3 doses a day.
Fiber; 12-15 grams extra from vegetable sources or supplements.
Garlic; 3 cloves per day.
Omega 3; 3 per day, 1 at beginning of each meal.
Lecithin; taken with the Omega 3.
Selenium
Lipoic Acid; at least 200mg daily, split into 2-3 doses.
Vitamin B Complex
Gingko Biloba; about 240mg daily, split into 2-3 doses.

Always check with your doctor before making changes in your nutritional or exercise habits.

MANAGING DIABETES FOR SENIOR CITIZENS

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We are all aging. It’s a simple, yet sometimes frustrating fact of life. So when frequent trips to the restroom, excessive thirst, weight loss or blurred vision begin to impede living, they potentially could be written off as just another factor in the aging process. But they could be symptoms of diabetes.

An estimated one third of seniors over the age of 65 are living with diabetes today. Caring and attentive Regent Healthcare staff members work with residents and their families to help lower the risk of diabetic complications by following a few healthy tips offered by the website.

Eat healthy. When preparing breakfasts, lunches and dinners, our Regent staff members choose only the best selections of meat and freshest produce to ensure well-balanced meals. The chefs at our communities can work with seniors with special dietary needs. A healthy diet is a must for residents dealing with Type I or Type II diabetes. When blood sugar levels are challenged, seniors are encouraged to grab a snack at many of our communities.

Never reuse disposable diabetic supplies. Residents can seek medication reminders or ask for medication administration from some of our Regent Staff. Our trained professionals can help ensure medical supplies don’t get contaminated and cause medical complications and infections that can be fatal. Seniors needing help keeping an adequate supply of diabetic supplies on hand should seek additional assistance from our staff.

Stay active. Encourage residents to exercise with regular programming designed to challenge them physically and emotionally. Tai Chi may be an alternative for seniors who have limited mobility due to arthritis or other joint conditions.

Although diabetes management is often easier for children and young adults, seniors being cared for by Regent Healthcare has the support necessary to meet their challenges and remain as healthy as possible.

Summer Nutrition Ideas & Hydration Tips For Seniors

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downloadWith the temperatures starting to climb for the summer months, it becomes more difficult to prepare hot foods, appetites decline, and actions become sluggish. As we age, our bodies lose their ability to regulate temperature as easily as it used to, so seniors may not realize they’re in danger of heat stroke or other heat-related illness. Knowing the difference between Heat Exhaustion (need to cool off & rest) and Heat Stroke (life-threatening) to determine if a senior needs immediate medical attention or simply needs help cooling off is vital for a caregiver:

Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion: headache, blurred vision, nausea, upset stomach, ashen appearance, low blood pressure, vomiting, sluggishness, fatigue, thirst, rapid weak heartbeat, profuse sweating and moderate increase in body temperature.

Symptoms of Heat Stroke: headache, dizziness, elevated or lowered blood pressure, disorientation, agitation, confusion, sluggishness, fatigue, seizures, hot dry skin, fainting, loss of consciousness, increased body temperature, rapid heartbeat and hallucinations.

Excessive heat makes all of our bodies work harder, so if you’re a caregiver, why not make it a bit easier on our elderly friends & family? Here are some tips you can use to ensure seniors are receiving the nutrition they need while staying hydrated:

Create some pre-made healthy snacks—cut up some fruit and vegetables in ready-to-eat small portions. Celery, cucumbers, green peppers, carrots, watermelon, cantaloupe, grapes, and strawberries are full of water to ensure seniors are staying hydrated as well as being nutritious.

Prepare ahead of time some light meals that are pre-cooked, just needs reheated, so they don’t have to stand in front of a hot oven to cook. Include some lean proteins for energy.
Prepare ahead of time some smoothies to replace meals if your senior doesn’t feel like eating. Be sure to add spinach (for protein) and light yogurt instead of ice cream, which not provide any nutritional benefit.

If it’s difficult to get your friend or family member to drink plain water, consider some flavored waters, teas, or juices. However, limit the caffeine intake as that can dehydrate a person!

Set aside some loose fitting, light clothes so not to restrict a senior’s movement and to make them feel more comfortable in higher temperatures. Limit sun exposure during 10am & 3pm

If the person is over-heated, apply cool water to the skin and fan the wet skin. You can also apply ice cubes wrapped in a towel to the head, neck, & arm pits to cool down faster.
If there is no air conditioning available, consider purchasing a fan for their room, and encourage the person to lie down & rest.

These tips are meant as guidelines and not to be taken as medical advice. Please seek immediate medical attention if your senior is experiencing heat-related issues. And feel free to let us know if we can provide personalized in-home health care for your loved one! Stay safe and have a fun summer!

Eight Reasons to Choose Home Care

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As tough as it may be to enlist the help of a “stranger” when it comes to caring for your parents, sometimes it’s for the best. For one thing, it will take the strain off of you, but your parent will also benefit from professional care in the comforts of home. Whether it’s being attentive to special medical needs of assisting with personal care or homemaking, having a home health care professional will provide a variety of benefits to both the patient and the family.

1 – Home Care promotes healing.
Our clients enjoy a much better quality of life which many families have said helped to extend the lives of their lived ones. We focused on healing the mind, not just the body.They are in a familiar environment and are more comfortable. This is particularly true with individuals suffering from dementia.

2 – Home Care is safe.
Many risks such as infection are eliminated or minimized when care is given at home. Quality home care by professional caregivers can help prevent issues that may become very serious within the home. One example includes preventing falls in the home since seniors may be too weak or dizzy from medication since they fall when they’re cleaning or bathing.

3 – Home care allows for maximum amount of freedom for the individual.
Patients at home may be engaged with their typical daily activities as their health permits plus it allows patients to receive care in the least restrictive environment. This is the most conducive to patient-centered care which allows individuals the most control over the care they’ll receive and the manner in which they receive it. Plus it allows individuals to remain in the community.

4 – Home care gives them some control.
As baby boomers age the home care option gives them more control over the type of care they’ll get to choose. They want more choices and want to be a more active participant in their own care. Home care allows them the most say in their care as they are in the least passive situation.

5 – Home care is personalized.
The best reason to choose home care is because the care that will be received in the home will be individualized to each patient according to their specific needs. Essentially home care is tailored to the needs of each patient as they receive one-on-one attention.

6 – It eases burdens on the family.
With the length of stay in the hospital decreasing patients are going home earlier and many of them do not choose to go to a rehabilitation center to recover. They want to go home to their own environment with their loved ones and have someone provide them with care they’ll need to reach their maximum level of function. Families are willing to have their loved ones with them, but may feel inadequate or unable to provide their loved ones with the help that they might need.

7 – Home care is comfortable.
Every study done has shown that people would prefer to stay in their home. There is familiarity and comfort of being in one’s own environment surrounded by their loved ones. It’s a type of quality care that people would want for their senior relatives.